Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Eleanor Marx explains why sometimes socialists should support liberals

From Eleanor Marx: Working Women vs. Bourgeois Feminism (italics mine):
There is no doubt that there is a women’s question. But for us – who gain the right to be counted among the working class either by birth or by working for the workers’ cause – this issue belongs to the general working-class movement. We can understand, sympathise, and also help if need be, when women of the upper or middle class fight for rights that are well-founded and whose achievement will benefit working-women also. I say, we can even help: has not the Communist Manifesto taught us that it is our duty to support any progressive movement that benefits the workers’ cause, even if this movement is not our own?

Emma's observation about Jesus and tough love

Emma: What are you thinking about?

Me: I was just in a discussion with a conservative who thinks Jesus was about tough love.

Emma: Yeah, if you were a money-changer.

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Peasant or Whatever Diet, Day 4: Lost 3 pounds

Because our scale isn't the most precise, I'm not sure if I lost four pounds or two and a half, so I'm calling it three.

When I was in seventh grade, I decided I wanted to lose weight. I did it partly by having a growth spurt and partly by eating my usual sandwiches with one slice of bread instead of two and bicycling to school instead of taking the bus. Sadly, I can't count on a growth spurt now, but the rest of what I figured out then is the basis of every diet: get moving and don't eat what you don't need. The nice thing about calorie-counting is you learn what the food industry doesn't want you to think about: almost everything's more caloric than you assume. The bulk of their profit comes from selling food to entertain you instead of food to sustain you.

Friday, October 21, 2016

The Peasant Diet could take three forms

1. Recreationist. You only use what would've been available to the peasants you're choosing as inspiration for your diet. Bonus points if you cook the food exactly as they would've. Super bonus points if you grow and hunt your own. Any of the recreationist approaches would be difficult and expensive because many foods have changed over the centuries as farmers grew them for different characteristics.

2. No-counting, all you can eat. The "all you can eat" would be potatoes or brown rice or oatmeal, green vegetables, and, once a day, a moderate serving of eggs or dairy or beans.

3. Counting-calories. This is great for people who like puzzles: you get to put the pieces together every day to eat in a range where you won't feel like you're starving but you'll still lose weight. The basic principle is to focus on simple foods and avoid things that would've been time-intensive luxuries in older times.

I'll probably go with #3. I'm too fond of variety in my diet. Which, I realize is part of the reason I'm not thin.

I'll do a concluding post on this tomorrow, and find out whether I've managed to lose any weight.